The Seasons are Changing

The Fall leaves have just peaked and we just photographed in our first snow in Colorado.

As you start to consider workshops for 2020 and 2021, I want to explain how our $100 referral credit works with Tom Bol Photo Workshops. Most of our new participants on workshops are referred by loyal clients, like you! We really appreciate this type of support and want to reward you with a $100 credit on your next workshop when you refer a new participant to us who signs up for a workshop.

As we move closer to the gift giving season, you may have thought about purchasing a workshop spot for someone you know. The referral credit of $100 off would also apply to a gift, if it is for someone who is new to Tom Bol Photo Workshops.

Maroon Bells

If you have referred someone in the past and did not receive a referral credit, please send me an email (sometimes we are not aware of referrals.)

Photo of the Month – September 2019

Tom and I want to celebrate the great images being created on our workshops by posting a photograph each month from one of our workshops that best captures the environment or people of that location.

Congratulations to September’s photographer – Joe Campbell

 

The Story:

“We were doing the iconic shots of the Blue Swallow Motel – the larger view of everything. I had the 1951 Pontiac, the office, the sign, storm clouds, the painting of Route 66 on the driveway. I was very happy with that.

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The Larger View

 

I decided to focus on something simple,. My parents had a Pontiac with Chief Pontiac on the front, which lit up when the head lights were turned on. I took some photos with reflections of the neon lights on the car. Then I turned the other way and used the black mailbox to create the dark background. With the 70-300, I just crouched down a bit and the mailbox was like a black curtain. It provided good separation from the bigger scene.”

 

Chief Pontiac
Photo of the Month – Chief Pontiac

The Location: 

The Blue Swallow Motel is great! I loved the atmosphere at night….sitting around the neon and having a relaxing drink. 

They had the Hudson and the 51 Pontiac. It was great that they changed them out for photographic purposes.

The Data: Nikon D850, 70-300mm lens 1/125 at f8 ISO 800

Photo Tip from the Photographer: 

Get the big picture first. Then move in and focus on single things. Look for neon reflections in the windows and rain puddles. I shot Chief Pontiac several different ways. The black background was my favorite.

On the Horizon:

  • Back to the Chilkat Eagle Preserve in Haines, Alaska
  • Northern Lights in Fairbanks
  • Costa Rica (for the third time)

 

 

How much do you know about Route 66? Check out the following from the History Channel: 8 Things You May Not Know About Route 66 

 

Back by Popular Demand – Tucson

We had such a spectacular cactus bloom on our Tucson Workshop this year that Tom and I are still talking about it. Several people have asked if we would be offering the trip again…. so we added new trip dates: March 24-28, 2021 Limited to 10 people. Cost $1449. For more details Click here

We explore the Sonoran Desert on this workshop around Saguaro National Park. We photograph forests of cacti, desert birds from a blind and raptors at the Arizona Sonoran Desert. We also spend a morning at Old Tucson photographing cowboys with speed lights to catcht a glimpse of the Old West.

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We also added 2021 dates for two other very popular workshops:

Route 66: Albuquerque to Amarillo in 2021

Bosque & White Sands in 2021

Photo of the Month – August 2019

Tom and I want to celebrate the great images being created on our workshops by posting a photograph each month from one of our workshops that best captures the environment or people of that location.

Congratulations to our fourth photographer – Susan Onysko

Katmai National Park, Alaska.

The Story:

“We stayed with this mom and two kids for a long time. All of the sudden the mom stopped and was looking into the forest. One of the little babies came up and draped his head on her shoulder. Then it was chaotic. The cub turned and looked back. The mom looked back. The cub put his paw on the mom….

SusanOnyskoPhoto_ACubsLove

That’s why I like wildlife photography. It’s moments like that. It’s the same as us. I am a mom and have a bond with my children just like this bear family.”

 

The Location: 

I loved Katmai National Park.I don’t think we could have taken so many “keepers” without the long hikes. The remote location lets you follow the bears and document their life. The bears were everywhere!

The Data: Nikon D850, 500mm,  1/1000, f/5.6 ISO 320

Nikon D850, 24-105mm converted for infrared, 1/500, f4, ISO200

Photo Tip from the Photographer: 

Don’t look at the back of your camera when the photo moment is happening. You have to be in the moment with grizzlies in the wild.

On the Horizon:

  • Uganda & Rwanda for gorillas
  • South Georgia Island
  • Underground blinds in Africa

SusanOnyskoPhoto_BigGulp

Check out Tom’s new blog on the pack he plans to take on next year’s trip to Katmai National Park Best Backpack Ever

 

Photo of the Month – July 2019

Tom and I want to celebrate the great images being created on our workshops by posting a photograph each month from one of our workshops that best captures the environment or people of that location.

Congratulations to July’s featured photographer – Bob Foster

Crescent City 07242017 - BobFosterReview 3

The Story:

“We stopped at a roadside location and Tom went running down the trail to scout for a good spot to shoot. We all congregated where he stopped.  I took the shot along with everyone else.

Before then, I wandered to a spot which I thought might be good, but the light had not reached it yet. After taking the group shot, I decided to try that location again. I ended up 150 feet down the path and the scene opened up. I bracketed using 1 stop for 5 shots. Nobody else came down there. It being me, I asked “what’s around the corner.

The Location: 

The redwoods location is pretty amazing. You have to stretch as a photographer to get a good shot. It is different in the redwood forest than photographing a wide sweeping landscape in the mountains. The variety and diversity in the coastal redwoods is spectacular. There were times where I let my camera hang at my side and just wandered through the beauty.

The Data:

Nikon Z7, 14-30mm f4.5  1 sec, f11, ISO 1000

Photo Tip from the Photographer: 

Take the path least traveled. Turn around, look the other way.  In tough lighting conditions, use bracketing.

On the Horizon:

  • Route 66 in 2020
  • The Apostle Islands in Northern Wisconsin
  • The Bahamas by sailboat

Bobmaple

Click on this link to read Tom’s take on the Nikon Z7 – Bob used the Z7 throughout the trip.

 

Photo of the Month – June 2019

Tom and I want to celebrate the great images being created on our workshops by posting a photograph each month from one of our workshops that best captures the environment or people of that location.

Congratulations to our second photographer – Zeralda La Grange

The Story:

“We were at the Yellow Mounds area trying to capture lightning. I turned around and there were great cloud formations. I knew it would be a great black and white image so I used my infrared camera.”

I just got the converted infrared camera back the week before. I wanted to get more into landscape photography so I converted my Canon 6D Mark II to full spectrum infrared and had it astral modified. I said to myself, “It’s going to be the smartest thing I ever did or the stupidest.”

I used a new program to process the image called CLIR (Creative Light  & Infrared). I  have only used it for the last month. It simplifies the infrared post process. My style of photography is trial and error. I am like the kid in the elevator who gets in and pushes all the buttons. I’ll do 4 edits of the same pictures and they all turn out different.”

The Location: 

I loved the versatility of the Badlands. In the morning and evening you have animals and landscapes. There are storms and lightning in the afternoon and midday you can shoot infrared. I was shocked with all the green grass in the park.

The Data:

Canon EOS 6D Mark II, 24-105mm converted for infrared, 1/500, f4, ISO200

Photo Tip from the Photographer: 

Don’t be afraid to try black and white. I have always been able to visualize what a scene will look like with black and white. If you are not happy with the colors you are getting, try black and white.

On the Horizon:

The Galapagos Islands – I like the challenge of capturing animals in their habitat

Badlands Workshop 2019
Badlands Workshop 2019

 

To learn more about the basics of infrared check out The Easy Guide to Infrared Photography